How to avoid rotting wood fence post?

Watch the video to see an example of how to avoid rotting wood fence post.

How to avoid rotting wood fence post? Our suggestion is to dig down around all your wood fence post so that when you are sealing and staining your fence the seal and stain can get all the way down to the concrete locking out the moisture that can cause your wood fence post to rot.

The seal and stains main purpose is to lock out moisture and make your wood fence last longer but we forget the part of our fence that is most likely to rot first. Most of the information on this topic shows you what to do when installing your fence but for most of us, we hire others to install our fence and it is us to perform the proper fence maintenance to protect our investment. And we do see it often, a fence 2-5 years old with the post rotting due to improper fence maintenance. 

There is about 2” - 6” of dirt over top of the post concrete so that grass will grow. If you can dig down around the post when you are doing your normal fence seal and stain maintenance making sure you seal out moisture all the way to the concrete, your fence post will last longer than they would without the extra layer of moisture protection. If it does make sense for your application there is an asphalt fence post sealant that is even better. The sealant is black and messy so if that is a problem just stick with your normal fence seal and stain.

A few more suggestions would be to never garden close to your fence post, to make sure sprinkler systems are not keeping your fence post wet, to never mulch or do anything that could encourage moisture retainage.

If the maintenance needed for wood fences makes you afraid check out our PVC Fence Versus A Wood Fence blog and vlog to check out your options before you purchase a new fence.

 

Comment below if you have any additional questions.

K & C Fence Company - Nashville Fence Contractor